​ellie pinzarrone

quick biography

 Ellie Pinzarrone received her M.A. in Art History from American University in 2010.  She triple majored in History, Art History and Gender & Women’s Studies as an undergraduate student at the University of Illinois.  Originally from Rockford, Ellie has served as an Art History lecturer for the Quincy Art Center, Womanspace, and as a Fine Arts instructor at John Wood College. Ellie has written and delivered dozens of lectures in the Midwest covering topics ranging from Women in Renaissance Art to Alfred Hitchcock & Film Theory.  She is the founder of Ellie Pinz Studio–a physical and online gallery-classroom where art education, art making, and creativity thrive!  Ellie produces one-of-a-kind artwork as well as educational tools emphasizing the power of right brain thinking.

​​​​​​   As the child of two incredibly talented artists, I grew up in a magical forest of creative thinking!  Our house was filled with artwork, various art supplies, and artist family friends.   Art was the sustenance that nurtured my spirit, and I was metaphorically and physically sandwiched by my parents’ creative modes: my mom had a studio for her watercolors in the attic, and my dad created airbrush pieces in the basement.  Though stylistically polar opposites, their philosophy of what made “good art” was, and remains, very much the same.  In a nutshell I would say this vision consists of meticulousness, Playfulness, And a keen sense of color; these are the pillars that formed my art education and the qualities I am still drawn to in art.    

     

     In 1998 I travelled to Italy with my mother, and my love for Art History was born. Initially because of my own Sicilian ancestry, I was intensely attracted to Italian artists and their history.  I studied Renaissance art in graduate school and found the processes, stories, and images endlessly bewitching; this work will never cease to amaze and inspire me.  

     

     As an artist, I aspire to create work that inspires a similar sensibility regarding craftsmanship and attention to details; in doing so I align with the philosophy of my parents and their emphasis on these qualities in art making.  I embrace needlework traditions in my process for multiple reasons.  I love the textures and the slightly sculptural qualities of beaded imagery, I enjoy using glittering opulent beads and metallic threads, and most importantly, embroidery allows me an intentional connection with stitching practices that women have used for centuries. 

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